Course Catalog 2019-20

Woodinville High School

Home of the Falcons
"One Falcon, One Family"

At Woodinville High School, we work together to preserve the integrity of the Northshore School District diploma. A rigorous curriculum and requirements that challenge our students is provided in an atmosphere where they learn to solve problems, rise to new heights, and participate in all of our "5 A's": Academics, Activities, Advanced Placement, Athletics, and the Arts.

Northshore School District high schools provide a learning environment in which all students can pursue knowledge, develop positive attitudes, and acquire skills necessary for lifelong learning and responsible citizenship in an interdependent world.

As students make course selections for the coming school year, they are encouraged to think deeply, process their choices carefully, and weigh all the options before making final selections. The master schedule of courses developed for the 2019-20 school year, along with corresponding staffing decisions, will be based on the course requests students make at this time.

We look forward to partnering with our students, parents, and guardians and wish our Falcons much success during the 2019-20 school year!

WHS COURSE CATALOG 2019-20 .pdf download

The Course Catalog will familiarize students and parents/guardians with school procedures, curriculum, graduation requirements, and post-secondary planning.  Students are responsible for understanding graduation requirements and admission requirements for post-high school education.


 

WHS Course Catalog 2019-20

Expected Student Outcomes, Counseling Center, and Scheduling

Northshore School District is committed to developing programs and courses operated in conformity with all Federal and State laws prohibiting discrimination based on race, color, national origin, disability, gender, sex, sexual orientation, religion, or military service.

Expected Student Outcomes
  • Preparation of all students to become lifelong learners through the development of creative and critical thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills.
  • Development of a mastery of core competencies to prepare for the workplace and/or continued education.
  • Preparation of all students to become ethical, responsible, and contributing world citizens.
  • Assistance for students in developing the attitudes, behaviors, and skills necessary to fulfill their potential.

Counseling Center

The primary focus of the Counseling Department is to help students with academic, personal, and vocational planning and to foster personal exploration and self-awareness.  Students are encouraged to set realistic yet challenging goals, to make responsible decisions, to understand the consequences of their choices, and to learn to self-advocate.  All students are assigned to a counselor by the first letter of their last name.  Students remain with their respective counselor throughout the high school.


Scheduling
Students may access classes and programs only at their high school of record/home high school unless they are classes or programs specifically noted as “Satellite program – open to all NSD students,” or WaNIC offerings.
 
Please note that course availability is dependent upon adequate registrations and available staffing.
If you cannot find answers you need or if you would like to have individual help in planning your course of study, please contact your counselor at your school:
 

Kate Miller

A-C

kmiller3@nsd.org

Kat Lamb

D-H

klamb@nsd.org

Scott Churchill

I-Mi

schurchill@nsd.org

 

Nate Hirsch

Mo-Sh

nhirsch@nsd.org

 

Sarah Brenner

Si-Z

sbrenner@nsd.org

 

Mrs. Krochmalny

College & Career

vkrochmalny@nsd.org

 

Credits

 

Credits

Credit is obtained by attaining a passing grade in a regularly scheduled course. Students earn .50 credit for each semester course. All students are responsible for reviewing and monitoring progress toward graduation. Transcripts and diploma summaries are distributed annually. Instructions on how to read and interpret these documents are given. Seniors should conference with counselors im­mediately if they are not enrolled in courses that will meet graduation requirements. Counselors are available to offer guidance in addressing credit deficiencies. Students who have failed course re­quirements for graduation need to schedule an appointment with their counselor to develop a plan to meet those requirements. Counselors can provide distance-learning options. All outside and online courses must be pre-approved to be placed on the transcript. Only courses from approved providers will be accepted as viable transfer credits.

 

Diploma Requirements for Graduation

Diploma Requirements for Graduation

 

 

The following subject areas of study and credits shall be required of each candidate for graduation.

Students will complete 17 Core plus 3 Personalized Pathway* plus 4 Elective credits.

 

Subject

  Credits

English

  4.00 credits

Mathematics

  3.00 credits

Science

  3.00 credits

Social Studies

  3.00 credits

Health/Fitness

  2.00 credits

Career & Technical Education (Occupational Ed.)

  1.00 credit

The Arts

  2.00 credits  -OR- 1.00 Arts + 1.00 PPR*

World Language

  2.00 credits  -OR- 2.00 PPR*

Elective Credits

  4.00 credits

TOTAL

24.00 credits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* PPR = Personalized Pathway Requirements: Courses that lead to a specific post-high school career outcome chosen by the student, based on the student’s interest and High School and Beyond Plan. PPR could be an extra credit of Art, two credits of World Language or credits in another subject area focused in the student’s area of interest.

  • Each whole number above indicates a year course of study.  An example is:  Mathematics with 3.00 credits means three years of study required.
  • Mathematics: 3.0 credits: 1.0 Algebra I, 1.0 Geometry, and a 3rd credit of math chosen by the student based on the student’s interest and High School and Beyond Plan, and approved by the parent or guardian, or if the parent or guardian is unavailable or does not indicate a preference, the school counselor or principal.
  • Science: 3.0 credits: 2.0 credits of lab science and a 3rd credit of science chosen by the student based on the student’s interest and High School and Beyond Plan, and approved by the parent or guardian, or if the parent or guardian is unavailable or does not indicate a preference, the school counselor or principal.
  • Social Studies: 3.0 credits: 1.0 World History, 1.0 US History, and 1.0 credit in Contemporary World Issues (.50 credit of the 1.0 Contemporary World Issues credit must fulfill the Civics requirement.) One semester in Washington State History and Constitution must be met in 7th grade as a non-credit bearing high school course.
  • Health and Fitness: 2.0 credits (1.0 credit in Physical Education, .50 credit in Life/Fitness, .50 credit in Health)
  • Career and Technical Education (Occupational Ed.): 1.0 credit that meets CTE exploratory requirements or higher.
  • The Arts: 2.0 credits: 1.0 credit to be met in visual and/or performing arts courses, and 1.0 PPR* (see above) credit.
  • World Language: 2.0 PPR* (see above) credits.
  • Elective Credits: 4.0 credits chosen by the student.
  • Successfully complete two courses in any combination of AP, IB, College in the High School, Tech Prep, and/or Running Start, unless an alternative course of study is identified through the student’s High School and Beyond Plan.
  • Complete the High School and Beyond Plan
  • Meet all State high school assessment requirements

If a student earns credit through a Career and Technical Education (CTE) course that is equivalent to a non-CTE course that meets another graduation requirement, the student shall not be required to earn a second credit in the non-CTE graduation requirement course, and vice-versa. The single course would meet two diploma requirements. However, only one credit would be awarded. The student would then be required to earn an additional elective credit, as total credits for graduation will not change.

To preserve the integrity of the Northshore comprehensive high school diploma, 85% of the required credits for graduation shall be earned through the student’s comprehensive high school course offerings. No more than 50% of the graduation requirements in any discipline may be obtained from approved accredited sources outside the Northshore School District. Students who earn more than 15% of the total required credits or more than 50% of the required credits in any discipline from outside sources, and who complete all district requirements for graduation, shall receive a generic Northshore School District diploma.

Courses

Career & College Readiness

CAREER & COLLEGE READINESS

CTE is at the front of innovation in education in the Northshore School District. There is nothing more exciting than seeing students engaged in studies that push them to their limits, spark their imaginations. To be career and college ready, you need to be able to integrate and apply 21st century skills, technical knowledge and skills, and core academic knowledge. With an emphasis on real world, real life skills, Career and Technical Education – Northshore School District connects you to academics and training that will help you be successful in the future through hands on, applied learning. Our goal is that every student will graduate from high school globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and prepared for life in the 21st century. No matter what your dream, you can pursue it through CTE.

Career & College Readiness Courses

Business & Marketing

BUSINESS AND MARKETING

BFI315 - FINANCE: Personal Wealth Management and Investment

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education (TP Credit), M3*

Other Info: Up to 5 college credits available; If the course is being taken to meet 3rd year math option, student must have previously earned one credit in Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 equivalent course and have earned one credit in Geometry or are concurrently enrolled in Geometry and the 3rd year math option course.

Now is the time to start understanding finance in mathematical terms and gain confidence in your ability to manage money. This course is designed to build on your prior math knowledge while taking you step-by-step through strategies that will help you learn the time value of money, how to evaluate the best budgeting and investment strategies, how to build a career resume, and how to buy, sell, trade, and analyze stocks. Students also actively work with how to manage checking and savings accounts, credit and credit cards, estimate and analyze loans, and how to prepare for housing and auto expenses! Using math in everyday life is what Personal Finance is all about, investing in your current future financial aptitude!

*This course meets 3rd year math requirements as a Career Pathway Option. Students will need to meet with their counselors to complete the registration, parent conference, and sign off requirements prior to signing up for this course as a 3rd year math option.


BEC300/BEC301 - AP MACRO/MICRO ECONOMICS

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Other Info:  Students are encouraged to take the AP tests (Microeconomics AND Macroeconomics) in the spring.

Students will start the year learning AP Macroeconomics which is the study of the economy as a whole. It includes topics such as: International trade and exchange rates and how interest rates, taxes and government policies influence investment, unemployment, inflation and economic growth. Second semester focuses on AP Microeconomics which is the study of how businesses, individual consumers, and governments interact in the marketplace. It includes topics such as: supply and demand, taxes, business costs (revenue, variable/fixed costs, profit). AP Economics is a fast-paced, challenging and exciting course for any motivated student. Students who are successful in this course will be prepared to take BOTH the AP Macroeconomics and AP Microeconomics exams in the spring.


BMD110 - INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Other Info: Up to 5 college credits available

Introduction to Marketing gives students a distinct advantage over others no matter what they choose as their future career. The concepts of the 4 P’s of marketing, target marketing, branding, selling, presentation, etc. are applied to creative and fun projects.  Our philosophy is to learn by doing and applying the concepts. I want someone who can sell rather than someone who can define how to sell. In addition, not only will we apply the material to products and services, but we also apply the material to the most important product, you. Understanding how to brand, sell, and present you will ultimately land you those coveted words “You got the job!” Finally, students will instantly have a resume talking point as they will be a part of recognized organization Woodinville high school DECA. DECA gives students the opportunity to practice the skills learned in the class through competition and to build a network with business professionals and alumni in our community. The impact of marketing class goes beyond the walls of the school.


BMD150 - ADVANCED MARKETING

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Prerequisite: Completion of Intro to Marketing

Other Info:  Up to 5 college credits available

Advanced marketing is designed to continue to develop and enhance skills learned in Introduction to Marketing. Students will create and develop proposals to present as if to gain commitment from a client. In addition, marketing students will also tap into their entrepreneurial spirit through business plan development. All of the skills are transferable to overall general student growth as they will develop their individual plan and develop an individual proposal to get that job! Finally, students will apply all of their skills in the Woodinville DECA program through competition and developing their network with community business professionals and alumni. We welcome your continued involvement in our comprehensive program this fall!

DECA is the international student association, with 215,000 members, that all marketing students are encouraged to join. DECA provides students with many opportunities for travel, leadership development, case study competitions, DECA only scholarships, and fun. DECA is the “varsity sport of business”. Topics covered are universal in the world of business and apply to both profit and not-for profit organizations.


BMM170 - MARKETING MANAGEMENT

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Prerequisite: Completion of Advanced Marketing

This is an advanced marketing course for those students who have completed Intro and Advanced Marketing. This is the 3rd year course in the Marketing/DECA pathway and will be heavily focused on preparation for DECA competitions. In addition, management of training, hiring, firing, organization, controlling, motivating, and implementation of decisions will be covered.


BLA105 - BUSINESS LAW

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Other Info:  Up to 5 college credits available

This course is designed to give students exposure to the types of law they will encounter every day. Topics covered include criminal and civil issues. An emphasis on case studies, role playing and group work will allow students to use their own life experiences to bring the course material to life and to keep the class relevant. Students learn the difference between criminal and tort law, elements of contracts, liability and negligence, and study consumer rights.


BRO105 - RETAIL OPERATIONS/ STUDENT STORE

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Other Info: Completion or concurrent enrollment in Marketing

This is a unique course involving on-campus work experience in a “real” retail business. Student employees are trained to operate electronic cash registers and to handle the following jobs: advertising, purchasing, inventory control, record-keeping, food preparation, stock maintenance, clothing sales, store maintenance and cleaning. Courtesy, service, honesty, confidence, and professionalism identify the successful student working in the store.   

 

Technology & Engineering

TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING

BMO100 - MICROSOFT OFFICE CERTIFICATION

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Other Info:  Up to 5 college credits available

Students may become an “expert” in Word and Excel working independently using college level materials. Upon successful completion of this course, students are prepared to take the Microsoft Industry Standard certification tests and become more competitive in today’s job market. This course can be repeated for additional opportunities to earn multiple Microsoft Office certifications.


TCS200 - INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES

Length/Credit: One semester/.5 credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: Career & Technical Education

This introductory survey course based on the UC Berkeley CS10 course offers students a hands-on introduction to computer science that surrounds us every day. The course is far more than just learning to program. We'll focus on some of the "Big Ideas" in computing, such as abstraction, design, recursion, concurrency, simulation, and the limits of computation. We'll show some beautiful applications of computing that have changed the world, talk about the history of computing, and where it will go in the future.


VJP300 - AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education, 3rd credit of Math, 3rd credit of Science

Other Info:  Students are encouraged to take the AP Computer Science A test in the spring.

This course introduces students to object oriented programming by teaching fundamental computer science concepts using the Java language.  The curriculum mirrors the CSE 142 and 143 classes at UW. Students are challenged to solve problems in new ways through procedural decomposition. Students will learn definite and indefinite looping, using varying data types, crafting methods with parameters and return values, branching with conditional execution, reading and writing to files, managing arrays and other collections, crafting classes and interfaces, optimizing searching and sorting procedures, and evaluating advanced recursive algorithms.


VCP520/VCP521 – ADVANCED PROGRAMMING TOPICS 1 and 2

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education, 3rd credit of Math, 3rd credit of Science

Prerequisite: AP Computer Science A

This course provides an opportunity for highly motivated students who have completed a yearlong college-level Computer Science course (Computer Science with C#.NET, AP Computer Science) to continue their studies in this field. The course builds on the fundamentals of object oriented programming established in APCS A. In the first semester, students will study data structures including lists, sets, maps, stacks, queues, and their own collection classes. Students will define, create and traverse trees. Students will also have the opportunity to survey other programming languages. In the second semester, students will design, plan, and create their own large scale project which could be a mobile app, desktop application, interactive website, or video game. Students in this course are expected to be able self-motivated and work at a high level.


VAT400A/B AVIATION: INTRODUCTION TO FLIGHT

Length/Credit: Full year/1 credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: none

Diploma Category:  CTE

Demand for aviation talent is high, and this course gives young men and women, without any prior experience, the opportunity to explore the world of aviation. Topics include aerodynamics, careers, charts, flight planning, history of aviation and space technology, navigation, piloting and propulsion systems. Each student has access to Lockheed-Martin Prepar3D® flight simulation systems, used to master a variety of aviation skills. This remarkable simulation technology allows our students to “fly” a variety of aircraft, including jets, in any weather condition, to any airport in the world, using sophisticated electronic navigation techniques. At least one field trip to an aviation related organization (such as the Boeing Museum of Flight) is typically included. All students participate in the King Schools ground school video curriculum as an integral part of this course. This widely acclaimed course is intended to prepare students to pass their FAA Private Pilot written exam!


TER215 - INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education, 3rd credit of Math**

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to explore the world of robotics through the basic principles of design, construction, and programming of robots while learning problem-solving techniques, mathematics, logic, creativity, physics, electronics, mechanics, teamwork, computers and computer programming. The class is structured for both technical and non-technical students. Students will first learn how the basic components of a robot operate and then learn to join them together to form a robot that can complete simple functions. Students will use VEX Robot kits to design, build, test and modify their own robots. In the labs, students either individually or as teams will be challenged to construct robots that will perform a series of tasks. The goal of the class is to provide students the opportunity to apply science, math, technology, and engineering skills and concepts to something which is both challenging and fun.

**If the course is being taken to meet 3rd year math option, student must have previously earned one credit in Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 equivalent course and have earned one credit in Geometry or are concurrently enrolled in Geometry and the 3rd year math option course.


TER300 – ADVANCED ROBOTICS

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit (can be repeated)

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Introduction to Robotics or previous robotics experience.

Diploma Category:  O (TP Credit)

This course is designed to give students with previous robotics experience the opportunity to further their knowledge.  Teams will fabricate a robotic through the basic principles of design, construction, and programming while learning problem-solving techniques, mathematics, logic, creativity, physics, electronics, mechanics, computers and computer programming.  The class is structured for both technical and non-technical students. Students will be creating their own robots through the entire design and fabrication process.  Use of metal fabrication CNC machines, CAD design, lasers, milling machines, and 3d printers will also be part of the course.  In the lab, students work as teams and will be challenged to construct robots that will perform a series of tasks. The goal of the class is to provide students the opportunity to apply science, math, technology, and engineering skills and concepts to something which is both challenging and fun.


TEC608 - ANIMATION TECHNOLOGY

Length/Credit: One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

 

This class will teach you the basics of 2D computer animation using the industry standard software Adobe Flash CS 5. Regardless of your ability to draw, you can create simple and complex animations using the unique tools and techniques of this amazing program. Learn frame-by-frame animation and “tweening” techniques. Learn how Flash is used in the development of web pages. Advanced students learn additional features of Flash including interactivity, action scripting and get the opportunity to try out a 3D program.

 


TEV135 - VIDEO PRODUCTION

Length/Credit: One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

 

This class produces and edits video for web formatting using both computer-based and Web 2.0 based software. Podcasting, scripting, storyboarding, concept development and video shooting are practiced and developed.


TEW201 - INTRODUCTION TO WELDING TECHNOLOGY

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Students will develop skills with oxyacetylene welding, cutting, and electric arc processes. Common metal joinery processes learned will include fusion welds, lap welds, and fillet welds in the flat position.


TEC105 – INTRO TO ENGINEERING/COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING (CAD)

Length/Credit: One semester/.5 credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

This course is open to any student who would like to learn about engineering design and the processes of building things. Applying problem solving, visual communication, and design skills along with using industrial technology systems, students create and build challenging and exciting projects. Units of study include manufacturing, electricity/electronics, energy, power, computer aided drafting (CAD), structures and architecture. Class projects will be hands-on and constructed out of a variety of materials that could include wood, metal and plastic.


TEC109 - PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

Length/Credit: Full year/1.0 credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

As you master the basic concepts needed to continue your education in engineering, you’ll apply them in this course while tackling real world challenges.  This course is designed to utilize the foundational skills learned in Introduction to Engineering Design in order to engage and challenge students while they explore a broad range of engineering topics that include energy sources and applications, mechanisms, fluid power, the strength of structures, materials, and automation. Students develop skills in problem solving, research, and design while learning strategies for design process documentation, collaboration, and presentation.  A working knowledge of trigonometry and basic mechanics (Physics) is highly suggested.  The biggest key towards success will be a highly motivated, self-learner with past success in STEM classes.  


TEC107 - AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (PLTW)

Length/Credit: Full year/1.0 credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Recommendation:  Completion or concurrent enrollment in Computer Aided Design (CAD) and/or VEX Robotics

As one of the specialty courses in the Project Lead The Way Engineering pathway, this course propels students into learning in the fundamentals of atmospheric and space flight. As they explore aeronautics, rocketry, and aerospace engineering, students bring concepts to life by hands-on projects like the creation of an airfoil, propulsion system, and rockets. Students explore basic orbital mechanics, robot systems, study materials and their applications, and learn about careers in aerospace.

Other Flexible Credits

OTHER FLEXIBLE CREDIT COURSES

TEA150 - ANNUAL STAFF (YEARBOOK)

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Are you interested in learning what it takes to be successful in a job? If so, yearbook is the class for you. For many students, this will be the first time they are part of a work staff. Yearbook staff members are responsible for creating a product (320 page yearbook) for paying customers (students/parents/staff). Students in this course will produce a 320-page yearbook over the course of the year. Yearbook staff members will spend the first 6 weeks of school learning about design, photography, writing, editing and interviewing. The rest of the school year staff will spend their time in class creating the yearbook pages in a lab based format. Student leadership and editor positions are also open for students who want develop skills in project management and leadership. Students in this class will be responsible for taking photos during/after school. Students who don’t drive or have transportation to take photos at sporting/school events after school will be given alternate in school photo assignment.  


ENG560A/B – NEWSPAPER MAGAZINE STAFF (QUILL)

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: Flex Credit

This course will cover all aspects of journalism, including (but not limited to) reporting, editing, page design & layout, web design, advertising, and photography. Student reporters will cover stories of interest to the school community, including: local/school news, academics, the arts, sports, student life, politics, film/music/restaurant (etc.) reviews, and other relevant & appropriate topics. Students will be responsible for publishing and distributing the school newspaper magazine.


YYN210 - LEADERSHIP CLASS

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: Flexible Credit

Are you interested in becoming involved in school leadership activities? In this course, students will learn to develop and strengthen leadership abilities by actively planning leadership lessons, working on committees, and participating in planning sessions. Students will be given the opportunity to participate in activities associated with homecoming, assemblies, school dances, and community service projects. Students will also be a part of the advertisement and promotion of school and community activities. Be a part of school leadership and make a difference in your school and the community.


YYN220 – LINK CREW CLASS

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Flexible Credit

Link Crew is a 9th grade transition program that focuses on enlightening the experience of a new high school student – socially, academically, emotionally, and mentally. Link Crew empowers students to support, encourage, and care for other students. In the Link Crew class, we will focus on topics such as team and climate building, organization, leadership, communication, facilitation and teaching, and personal development. Additionally, students will learn important mentoring skill and life skills that will help them create a positive climate and culture on our campus.


YYN221 - ASB OFFICER CLASS

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Prerequisite:  Must be elected to be an ASB or class office or selected by ASB for an appointed position.

This course is designed to instruct students in the various methods and techniques involved in planning, implementing, and evaluating projects. Leadership skills such as parliamen­tary procedure, time lines, budgeting, analysis of leadership style, and agenda planning will be stressed. Students will be given the opportunity to generate, develop and implement projects. Community service will be an integral part of this class. The course will be both project and instruction based.  


YYN071 - PEER COACHING (ADVOCATE FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM)

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Peer coaches will have the experience of working directly with students with moderate to significant developmental disabilities.  Peer coaches work with students in a variety of ways including: general academic support, 1:1 direct instruction, taking data, and classroom management. Students must be reliable, respectful, conscientious and able to take initiative.  This is a great opportunity for students interested in entering the teaching or medical fields.


YYN170 - TUTOR ELEMENTARY

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: Career & Technical Education

Students may tutor at Woodin or Kokanee Elementary, third through sixth periods, for credit. To qualify for this class, students must have good attendance, be highly responsible, and have the ability to work with students of varying abilities.  See the College & Career Counselor in the Career Center for teacher recommendation forms. Students will receive a Pass/No Credit grade.


MAT110MATH MENTOR

Length/Credit: One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Teacher permission

Diploma Category: Flexible credits

This course is available either semester. Math Mentors work with a variety of students with a wide range of abilities.  Math Mentors will be trained on instructional methods, data collection, and social interactions through “job shadowing” and “on the job” observations. Pass/Fail credit is given for this course.


SCI110 – SCIENCE MENTOR

Length/Credit: One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Teacher permission

Diploma Category: Flexible credits

This course is available either semester. Science Mentors work with a variety of students with a wide range of abilities.  Science Mentors will be trained on instructional methods, data collection, and social interactions through “job shadowing” and “on the job” observations. Pass/Fail credit is given for this course.

Satellite Programs

SATELLITE PROGRAMS

SKN314 - HEALTH SCIENCE CAREERS (MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS ACADEMY) SKILL CENTER PROGRAM

Length/Credit:  Full Year (3 consecutive periods)/3.0 Credits

Grades:  11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education (1.5), Health (.5), Lab Science (1) or 3rd credit of Science (1)

Other Info: This is a Skill Center Program offered at WHS. Fees are associated with this course for purchasing required supplies.  Up to 16 college credits available through Bellevue College.

Application: Career & College Readiness Satellite Program Application is required.

This intensive course of study introduces students to a variety of careers in the health care industry with emphasis on hands-on, patient-oriented careers such as physician, nursing and other therapists. At the end of the year students are qualified for the Nursing Assistant State exam. Nursing Assistant is an entry level position in healthcare and will allow you to enter the medical field right after graduation from the program.

Instruction Includes:

·       Health care field career exploration

·       Anatomy and physiology

·       Medical terminology

·       Pathophysiology and clinical manifestations

·       Infection control

·       Preventative & restorative care

·       Patient care

·       Communication with a patient and a care team

·       Electronic charting

·       Clinical internship

·       CPR and First Aid Certification

·       HIV Certification

Classes meet at Woodinville High School for three consecutive periods in the morning or afternoon. Schedule of classes is available on WHS Health Science Careers site. Schedule allows travel time for students from other schools. Morning HSC students are back to their home schools in time for fourth period and afternoon students are able to leave their home school after third period. District transportation is available for transit between schools. An additional 7 shifts of clinical internship at skilled nursing facilities on Saturdays are spread throughout the school year. Clinical shadowing is available at Harborview Medical Center in May with school transportation provided.

WA State NAC certification exam is conducted at the end of the school year. The fee for the exam is $156, which includes the Department of Health license fee. Students are employable as Certified Nursing Assistant on the next day after exam. There is a very high demand for nursing assistants in the community. Students frequently get hired on the spot with the starting pay of $12-17/per hour. Other expenses: Scrubs - $25, white shoes for clinicals, a wristwatch, and a personalized sweatshirt - $35. Personal stethoscope is optional, as we provide them in class. HOSA membership is $15. All fees are fully refundable by a future employer if the graduate gets a job within the first year after completion of the program.

College credit: 16 college credits through Bellevue College, which are fully transferrable to any other college or university.

This program partners with UW Bothell Health Science Department, which includes pre-med, public, and global health tracks, as well as Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Students are actively involved in National HOSA (Health Occupation Students of America), a student leadership organization, successfully competing in multiple categories on a state and national level.


AGV100 - VITICULTURE

Length/Credit: Full year/1.0 credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: Career & Technical Education or 3rd Credit of Science

Application: Career & College Readiness Satellite Program Application is required.

Viticulture is the science behind the production and growing of grapes. Join this amazing new program as we join our local industry partners to learn about the application of science and agriculture principles to the business of grape growing. Units of study include instruction in grapes of the world; grape production; plant biology; chemistry; food science, safety, packaging; soil science; vineyard and pest management; and marketing and business management.


VWE301 - WELDING AND FABRICATION

Length/Credit:  One Semester (2 periods)/1 Credit

Grades:  10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Application and Acceptance

Application: Career & College Readiness Satellite Program Application is required.

The Welding and Fabrication program provides students with training in oxy-acetylene welding and cutting, arc welding, MIG welding and TIG welding. Students start with planning and layout work, then progress to setting up and operating welding and cutting (Oxy-Fuel, and Plasma) equipment. The students learn Shielded metal arc as well as MIG solid wire, Flux core, and TIG welding in all positions. Some of the metals we weld with are Carbon Steel, Aluminum and Stainless Steel to name a few. Emphasis is placed on safety as well as blueprint reading, properties of metal, metal identification, type and use of electrodes, welding rods, electrical principles, and welding symbols.

The use of manuals, specification charts, and understanding the welding standards established by the American Welding Society is stressed. Training in the planning, layout, forming, joining and fabrication of various shapes in light and heavy gauge metal and pipe is provided. Students are exposed to the use of specialized hand tools, shears, forming and shaping machines, drill presses, and metal cutting saws. Inspection and testing processes as well as procedures are also demonstrated and explained.

The students will work on various projects throughout the time they are enrolled in Welding and Fabrication. We work on projects for the school, other teachers, students, outside customers, etc.

English

ENGLISH

The study of English or Language Arts is essential in successfully navigating our ever changing and expanding global society. With constant changes and advances in technology, effective communication has become a skill we all must master, as our ability to successfully communicate across all modes is paramount to the success of all humankind.

While students are in attendance at WHS, the English Department will endeavor to prepare them with skills honed and mastered in the six essential parts of Language Arts; therefore, reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing are the main components upon which our lessons are built. Consequently, students have many opportunities through a variety of core classes as well as electives to expand their skills.

Please carefully read the descriptions of the courses in order to choose the right class for your needs. We encourage and welcome any student who wants to ask us questions about course selection because we want you to succeed and we enjoy helping you in any way we can.

English Courses

Freshmen

FRESHMEN

ENG100 - ENGLISH 9

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 9

Diploma Category: English 9

This course builds upon previous learning of the Common Core State English/Language Arts Standards in middle school, and establishes the skills necessary for a successful progression of learning to the next grade level of E/LA course work. Students will learn to sustain intellectual curiosity by interpreting a variety of texts including but not limited to: non-fiction, novels, plays, poetry, and short fiction. They will actively engage in the process of writing, including paragraph structure, narrative and persuasive essay development, literary analysis, and rhetorical analysis. Students will work collaboratively to broaden their understanding of language and their skills in communicating effectively.


ENG155 - PRE-AP ENGLISH 9

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 9

Diploma Category: English 9

This course builds upon previous learning of the Common Core State English/Language Arts (E/LA) Standards in middle school and establishes the skills necessary for a successful progression of learning for advanced high school E/LA course work. Students will read a variety of texts including but not limited to: non-fiction, novels, plays, poetry, and short fiction. Students will write analytical, persuasive, and narrative essays.


ELL100 – ELL ENGLISH 9

Length/Credit: Full year/1 Credit

Grade: 9

Diploma Category: English 9

This class is designed to help develop the English language in an academic setting through a focus on reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will master the necessary language skills through various forms of listening and speaking: direct instruction, peer-to-peer exercises, teacher-student collaboration, and presentations. Reading and writing development is practiced daily, per student need and grade level, and aligns with both the Common Core State Standards and ELPS Standards. The expectation is that students can use texts like Writing Analytically to help develop analysis methods for novels and articles used to supplement this skill building. In the end, this course aims to provide an environment that supports and fosters student language growth based on individual English language needs.

Sophomores

SOPHOMORES

ENG200 - ENGLISH 10

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 10

Diploma Category:  English 10

Students will learn to sustain intellectual curiosity by interpreting a variety of texts including but not limited to: non-fiction, novels, plays, poetry, and short fiction.  They will actively engage in the process of writing, including paragraph structure, essay development, literary analysis, and rhetorical analysis.  Students will work collaboratively to broaden their understanding of language and their ability to communicate effectively.


ENG255 - PRE-AP ENGLISH 10

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 10

Diploma Category:  English 10

This advanced class prepares sophomores for rigorous Advanced Placement programs.  Students will read a variety of texts including but not limited to: non-fiction, novels, plays, poetry, and short fiction.  Students will write analytical, persuasive, and narrative essays. 


APS110 – AP SEMINAR

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 credit

Grade: 10

Category:  English 10 or Flexible Credit

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP Seminar test in the spring.

The AP Seminar class will focus on two or more themes that allow for deep interdisciplinary exploration based on: concepts or issues from other AP courses, student interests, local and/ or civic issues, and Global or international topics. Exploring different points of view and making connections across disciplines are fundamental components of the AP Seminar experience. Students consider each topic through a variety of lenses and from multiple perspectives, many of which are divergent or competing. Students will be encouraged to explore a topic through several of the following lenses: cultural and social, artistic and philosophical, political and historical, environmental, economic, scientific, futuristic, and ethical. During the course, students will complete a team project, an individual paper and presentation, and take a final written exam. This course is the first of two courses available for students to earn the AP Capstone Diploma.


ELL200 – ELL ENGLISH 10

Length/Credit: Full year/1 Credit

Grade: 10

Diploma Category: English 10

This class is designed to help develop the English language in an academic setting through a focus on reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will master the necessary language skills through various forms of listening and speaking: direct instruction, peer-to-peer exercises, teacher-student collaboration, and presentations. Reading and writing development is practiced daily, per student need and grade level, and aligns with both the Common Core State Standards and ELPS Standards. The expectation is that students can use texts like Writing Analytically to help develop analysis methods for novels and articles used to supplement this skill building. In the end, this course aims to provide an environment that supports and fosters student language growth based on individual English language needs.

This class is designed for students receiving Special Education services and will be targeted at individual learning goals. Reading and writing development is practiced daily, per student need and grade level, and align with the Common Core State Standards.

Juniors

JUNIORS

ENG300 - ENGLISH 11

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 11

Diploma Category:  English 11

Students will further develop the core reading, writing and communication skills learned in previous years, including an emphasis on reading comprehension and critical thinking skills. The literature will include but not be limited to: novels, plays, poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction from the American tradition. There will be a variety of writing assignments, including but not limited to: literary analysis, research, persuasive, expository, personal narrative, compare and contrast, and creative writing.


ENG475 - AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 11, 12

Diploma Category: English 11, 12

Other Info:  Students are encouraged to take the AP English Language & Composition test in the spring

Advanced Placement Language and Composition is a yearlong college level course that culminates in the AP Language and Composition examination. Students will cultivate critical thinking by reading a wide variety of fiction and non-fiction texts, and will learn the basic elements of rhetoric. The focus of study will be the literal what of the text, the techniques of style underlying the how, and the timeless, universal connections of why.

AP English Language and Composition and AP English Literature and Composition form a two-year program of study and should be taken in sequence. While this is a recommendation, AP English Language and Composition is open to students who are wishing to challenge themselves in a college level course even though they do not intend to take AP English Literature and Composition.


APS110 – AP SEMINAR

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 credit

Grade: 11

Category:  English 11 or Flexible Credit

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP Seminar test in the spring.

The AP Seminar class will focus on two or more themes that allow for deep interdisciplinary exploration based on: concepts or issues from other AP courses, student interests, local and/ or civic issues, and Global or international topics. Exploring different points of view and making connections across disciplines are fundamental components of the AP Seminar experience. Students consider each topic through a variety of lenses and from multiple perspectives, many of which are divergent or competing. Students will be encouraged to explore a topic through several of the following lenses: cultural and social, artistic and philosophical, political and historical, environmental, economic, scientific, futuristic, and ethical. During the course, students will complete a team project, an individual paper and presentation, and take a final written exam. This course is the first of two courses available for students to earn the AP Capstone Diploma.


ELL300 – ELL ENGLISH 11

Length/Credit: Full year/1 Credit

Grade: 11

Diploma Category: English 11

This class is designed to help develop the English language in an academic setting through a focus on reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will master the necessary language skills through various forms of listening and speaking: direct instruction, peer-to-peer exercises, teacher-student collaboration, and presentations. Reading and writing development is practiced daily, per student need and grade level, and aligns with both the Common Core State Standards and ELPS Standards. The expectation is that students can use texts like Writing Analytically to help develop analysis methods for novels and articles used to supplement this skill building. In the end, this course aims to provide an environment that supports and fosters student language growth based on individual English language needs.

Seniors

SENIORS

 All of our senior offerings meet the requirements for college entrance and rigorously prepare students for college, career and beyond.


ENG450 - ENGLISH 12: FOCUS ON FICTION

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 12

Diploma Category:  English 12

Designed to prepare students for the rigor and pace of college study, this course requires students to consistently demonstrate a commitment to and a competence in language arts study.  Students will read challenging texts from world literature, write analytical essays, and read secondary critical sources. Throughout the course of the year, students will explore works of fiction, including full-length novels and plays as well as thematically related non-fiction, examining several different perspectives on a given subject, appreciating the wide range of opinions on that subject, and advancing their own ideas within the framework of current debates on the topic.  Students will continue their study of Writing Analytically with a focus on Critical Lens Essays and Academic Conversations.  


ENG451 - ENGLISH 12: FOCUS ON THE CLASSICS

Length/Credit: Full Year/ 1 Credit

Grade: 12

Diploma Category:  English 12

Prerequisite:  Commitment to attend evening and weekend performances

Designed to prepare students for the rigor and pace of college study, this course requires students to read selections from the classics of world literature and place them in the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which they were created, culminating in our attendance at evening and weekend performances to see live examples of what we study. Researching and writing critical analysis essays about these selections, their contexts, and the performances will be a major component of this class. Students will continue their study of Writing Analytically with a focus on the rhetorical analysis of various art forms, including visual art, music, architecture, and stage performances that were prolific in these contexts.  


ENG452 - ENGLISH 12: FOCUS ON CULTURE

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grade:  12

Diploma Category:  English 12

Designed to prepare students for the rigor and pace of college study, this course requires students to consistently demonstrate a commitment to rhetoric and the study of contemporary issues.  Students will also study the personal arenas that shape them, including culture, gender, race, and socioeconomic status.  Students will read a core collection of well-known essays, current articles, and short fiction and engage with video, radio segments, and photos on a wide range of topics.  Improvement of close analysis, reading, presentation skills, and writing will be stressed. Students will continue their study of Writing Analytically with a focus on Critical Lens Essays and Academic Conversations.


ENG453 - ENGLISH 12: FOCUS ON VOICE

Length/Credit: Full Year/ 1 Credit

Grade: 12

Diploma Category:  English 12

 

Designed to prepare students for the rigor and pace of college study, this course will have students further their knowledge of rhetoric, logic, research, and delivery through the arts of debate and creative writing. Poetry, short stories, plays, novels and speeches will be analyzed for their intent and effectiveness. The study of these texts will be used to influence writing in various genres. Routine collaboration and peer feedback workshops will be an expectation. Culminating projects will be both analytical and creative in nature. Students will continue their study of Writing Analytically with an emphasis on rhetorical awareness of audience.  


ENG480 - AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit  

Grades: 11, 12

Diploma Category: English 11, 12

Other Info:  Students are encouraged to take the AP English Literature & Composition test in the spring.

Advanced Placement Literature and Composition is a yearlong college level course that culminates in the AP Literature and Composition examination. Students will learn to produce complex academic arguments by reading a wide variety of text drawn from multiple genres, periods, and cultures.  

 

AP English Language and Composition and AP English Literature and Composition form a two-year program of study and should be taken in sequence. While this is a recommendation, AP English Literature is open to all students who are wishing to challenge themselves in a college level course regardless of prior AP experience.  


ELL400 – ELL ENGLISH 12

Length/Credit: Full year/1 Credit

Grade: 12

Diploma Category: English 12

This class is designed to help develop the English language in an academic setting through a focus on reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will master the necessary language skills through various forms of listening and speaking: direct instruction, peer-to-peer exercises, teacher-student collaboration, and presentations. Reading and writing development is practiced daily, per student need and grade level, and aligns with both the Common Core State Standards and ELPS Standards. The expectation is that students can use texts like Writing Analytically to help develop analysis methods for novels and articles used to supplement this skill building. In the end, this course aims to provide an environment that supports and fosters student language growth based on individual English language needs.

Health - Fitness

HEALTH – FITNESS

Health Education teaches our students that good health and safety principles can lead to a lifetime of healthy practices, resulting in more productive, active, and successful lives.

Physical education is an integral part of the educational process. Through a carefully planned instructional program and continuous re-evaluation, students will gain a variety of competencies and knowledge, which will contribute to their health and physical well-being.


HEA410 - HEALTH

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12 (recommended for 9th & 10th)

Diploma Category:  Health

Total well-being—mentally, physically, and socially is what health is about. This course has been developed to help you gain the knowledge and behaviors essential to increase your quality of life and wellness now as well as invest in your future health. Improving your health through nutrition and exercise, substance abuse prevention, managing your emotions and stress, handling crisis, decreasing your risk for heart disease and cancer, using proper CPR techniques, and human sexuality are topics that will be covered.  The goal is to help students understand the choices they make every day and the consequences each choice has on their health and wellness now and in the future.


PLF200 - LIFE FITNESS (WALKING)

Length/Credit: Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: Life Fitness and PE 9-12

 

Low impact exercise program for those individuals who like to walk and talk. Students will be out on a daily walk.  You will also receive instruction on nutrition and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

 


PLF235 - LIFE FITNESS (WEIGHT TRAINING)

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Life Fitness and PE 9-12

 

Students will acquire knowledge so that they can make informed decisions on a lifetime fitness program and the importance of maintaining a level of fitness.  This course includes cardiovascular training, lectures/portfolios, resistance training, and weight training.  Students will run once a week for cardiovascular development.


PLF240 - LIFE FITNESS (YOGA)

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Life Fitness and PE 9-12

 

Students will acquire knowledge so that they can make informed decisions on a lifetime fitness program and the importance of maintaining a level of fitness. Participation in Yoga is about creating balance in the body through developing both flexibility and strength.  Students will have the opportunity to experi­ence the many benefits of Yoga, which include flexibility, improved circulation of blood, increased stamina, and strength.  Yoga can lead to better overall physiological functioning throughout the body.  The practice of Yoga can help a student become more mentally and emotionally centered.  Students will increase their flexibility and strength and also gain a better understanding of the importance of fitness and having balance in their lives.


PRS200 - RACKET SPORTS

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  PE 9-12

 

This class is an introduction to racket sports with an emphasis on basic skills, rules, and strategies for badminton and pickle ball (tennis and ping pong possibly).  Class will also involve setting up and playing various tournaments.

 


PTS100 - TEAM SPORTS

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  PE 9-12

 

This class will offer students the opportunity to participate and improve their skills in a wide variety of team sports.  Such activities may include basketball, flag football, floor hockey, soccer, softball, speedball, team handball, ultimate Frisbee, and volleyball.  Curriculum will vary depending on the time of year and availability of facilities.

 


PSM200 - SPORTS MEDICINE

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  PE 9-12

 

This is a classroom study of athletic injuries, their causes, prevention, and treatment.  This introduction to the field of athletic training includes anatomy and athletic taping. Students will also participate in weekly physical activity.

           

Mathematics

MATHEMATICS

Mathematics is a field that is growing at a rapid rate, spreading into new fields, creating new applications, and becoming increasingly crucial to each of our lives. To be prepared to understand and use mathematics, all students are encouraged to learn as much mathematics as possible. Students are required to take three years of high school math while in high school for graduation, and most universities recommend four years of mathematics.

High School Math Course Sequence

 9th

Algebra 1

 

Geometry

 

Algebra 2-
Trigonometry

 

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 10th

Geometry

 

Alg 2-Trig

 

AP Prep Precalculus

 

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 11th

Algebra 2

 

AP Prep Precalculus

 

AP Calculus AB

 

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 12th

Precalculus or
AP Statistics

 

AP Calculus AB or
AP Statistics

 

AP Calculus BC,
AP Statistics

 


MAL100 - ALGEBRA I

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1Credit

Grades: 9, 10

Diploma Category:  Algebra 1

Equipment: A scientific calculator and the Texas Instrument TI-83/TI-84 family of graphing calculators is recommended.

 

This course expands on the students understanding of using arithmetic operations and properties to include the symbolic language of algebra.  Students will formalize their understanding of functions with a focus on linear functions and quadratic functions.  Students will also explore absolute value functions, piecewise-defined functions, and exponential functions.  Other topics that will be studied are writing equations to model linear equations, solving systems of linear equations and inequalities, solving quadratic equations with real roots, exponent laws and properties, arithmetic and geometric sequences, and data analysis.   Students will continue to develop problem solving, reasoning and proof, communication, and mathematical modeling skills aligned to the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

 


MGE100 - GEOMETRY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11

Diploma Category:  Geometry

Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 1

Equipment: A scientific calculator and the Texas Instrument TI-83/TI-84 family of graphing calculators is recommended.

 

Students will formalize their reasoning skills to write proofs built on definitions, axioms, and theorems.  Students will study parallel and perpendicular lines, triangle properties, quadrilateral properties, and properties of other polygons and circles.  Other topics that will be studied are similar and congruent figures, right triangle trigonometry, coordinate geometry, geometric transformations, area, surface area and volume of three-dimensional figures.


MAL140 - ALGEBRA II

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  3rd Credit of Math, Algebra 1

Prerequisite: Completion of Geometry

Equipment: A scientific calculator and the Texas Instrument TI-83/TI-84 family of graphing calculators is recommended.

 

Students will expand their understanding of number systems to include complex numbers and will grow more proficient in their use of algebraic techniques.  This course focuses on the study of functions:  linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, square root, cubic, and those involving inverse variation.  Other topics that will be studied are combinations and permutations, probability, binomial theorem, measures of variability, and geometric and arithmetic sequences and series.  This course meets the third year math requirement for high school graduation and college admission requirements.

 


MAL180 - ALGEBRA II-TRIGONOMETRY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  3rd Credit of Math, Algebra 1

Prerequisite: Completion of Geometry

Equipment: A scientific calculator and the Texas Instrument TI-83/TI-84 family of graphing calculators is recommended.

 

Students will expand their understanding of number systems to include complex numbers and will grow more proficient in their use of algebraic techniques.  This course focuses on the study of functions:  linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, square root, cubic, and those involving inverse variation.  Students will study periodic and trigonometric functions.  Other topics that will be studied are combinations and permutations, probability, binomial theorem, measures of variability, and geometric and arithmetic sequences and series.  This course meets the third year math requirement for high school graduation and college admission requirements.


MPC100 - PRE-CALCULUS

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  3rd Credit of Math, Algebra 1, Geometry

Prerequisite:  Completion of Algebra II or Algebra II-Trigonometry

Equipment: A scientific calculator is required. The Texas Instrument TI-83 or TI-84 family of graphing calculators is strongly recommended.  The Texas Instrument TI-83 or TI-84 family of graphing calculators is recommended.

This course covers the Pre-Calculus content with greater breadth and depth at a college level of rigor.  Students will continue to build and expand upon their understanding of functions and equations to include quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, rational, radical, power, and trigonometric functions.

 


MPC250 - AP PREP PRE-CALCULUS

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  3rd Credit of Math, Algebra 1, Geometry

Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra II or Algebra II-Trigonometry

Equipment: A scientific calculator and the Texas Instrument TI-83/TI-84 family of graphing calculators is recommended.

 

This course covers the Pre-Calculus content with greater breadth and depth at a college level of rigor. Students will continue to build and expand upon their understanding of functions and equations to include quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, rational, radical, power, and trigonometric functions.

 


MCA110 - AP CALCULUS AB

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  3rd Credit of Math, Algebra 1, Geometry

Prerequisite:  Completion of Pre-Calculus or AP Prep Pre-Calculus.

Other Info:  Students are encouraged to take the AP ‘AB’ Calculus test in the spring.

Equipment: A scientific calculator and the Texas Instrument TI-83/TI-84 family of graphing calculators is recommended.

 

AP Calculus I is a course designed for students with a high interest and strong background in mathematics. Students can choose the AP Program, or the Cascadia College in the High School program. The first semester of the course is equivalent to Math 151 (Differential Calculus). Both programs include a conceptual development, a formal development, and applications of basic differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is on process, problem solving, and clear communication of ideas and techniques. Students will have the option of taking the AP ‘AB’ Exam in the spring.


MCA111 - AP CALCULUS BC

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  3rd Credit of Math, Algebra 1, Geometry

Prerequisite:  Completion of AP Calculus AB

Other Info:  Students are encouraged to take the AP ‘BC’ Calculus test in the spring.

Equipment: A scientific calculator and the Texas Instrument TI-83/TI-84 family of graphing calculators is recommended.

 

AP Calculus II is a course designed for students who have successfully completed Calculus I. The first semester of this course is equivalent to Math 152 (Integral Calculus). The curriculum builds on Calculus I and extends to cover a second quarter and part of a third quarter of college calculus. Topics of study may include advanced integration techniques and applications, functions of several variables, parametric and polar functions, sequences and series, and vectors in R2 and R3.


MCA130 - AP STATISTICS

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  3rd Credit of Math

Prerequisite:  Completion of Algebra II or Algebra II-Trigonometry

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP Statistics test in the spring.

Equipment: A scientific calculator and the Texas Instrument TI-83/TI-84 family of graphing calculators is recommended.

 

This course is designed to offer a continued study of quantitative thinking in the areas of statistics and probability for the serious math student. Throughout this course students will be introduced to the major concepts and tools for collecting and analyzing data as it relates to four conceptual themes:  exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference.  This course reflects the content of a typical introductory college level statistics course.  This course may be taken concurrently with another mathematics course offering.

 

Science

SCIENCE

Science promotes curiosity and a sense of wonder, encourages lifelong exploration, and provides a foundation for understanding the natural world. Science courses promote hands-on learning in an environment that fosters scientific inquiry. Through scientific investigation, students expand their knowledge to better understand and explain the phenomena they observe in the world around them.


SCB100 - BIOLOGY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Lab Science

 

Biology is the study of the living world and our relationship to it.  This course is aligned to the NGSS (WSSLS) high school performance expectations for life science and also integrates sustainability principles.  As a result, the major disciplinary themes are:  metabolism, behavior, genetics, evolution, ecology and sustainability. Students will engage in both science and engineering practices as they explore the themes and relate them to the cross-cutting concepts of science.

 


SCB181 – PRE AP BIO/CHEMISTRY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 9

Diploma Category: Lab Science, 3rd Credit of Math

Recommendation: Completion or concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2 or higher

 

This is a rigorous and fast-paced course designed to give students interested in science and intending to take AP Biology and/or AP Chemistry the strong foundation in content and scientific practices necessary to succeed without taking two years of coursework to do so.  The curriculum is aligned to the NGSS high school performance expectations for biology and chemistry and emphasizes experimental methodologies.  Students will participate in developing scientific questions, plan and implement scientific investigations, analyze data, and formulate scientific explanations in this demanding and engaging course.

 


SCB180 - AP BIOLOGY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Lab Science

Other Info:  Students are encouraged to take the AP Biology test in the spring.

Prerequisites: Completion or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry

 

Advanced Placement Biology is a second year course designed to prepare students to do well on the optional Advanced Placement Biology exam.  It will consider, but not be limited to, biology, ecology, chemistry of cells, cellular energy, evolutionary diversity of organisms, function of plants and animals, heredity, life, and molecular genetics and structure.  These topics will be covered through class discussions, lectures, independent student research and both teacher-directed and independent experiments.  Some dissection may be required.  Students need to be able to work independently.  This course meets college entrance requirements for an algebra-based science.

 


SCB315 – BIOTECHNOLOGY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  9, 10

Diploma Category:  Lab Science, Career and Technical Education

 

The Biomedical Science course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of biology with a focus on current biomedical research and modern laboratory technology. In addition to introductory biology, students will be exposed to topics including bioethics, biotechnology, laboratory practice, and career opportunities in the scientific/medical field. Students taking Biomedical Science as an occupational ed. credit will participate in a field trip to a research facility to meet professionals in the biomedical field. They will also participate in an annual Bio Expo that will allow them to design/conduct a scientific project and compete against other students in WA State. Biomedical Science is an exciting, but challenging, course best suited for students who are seriously interested in pursuing careers in the scientific/medical field.

 


SCB316 - ADVANCED BIOTECHNOLOGY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career and Technical Education, Lab Science, 3rd Credit of Science

Other info:  Up to 5 college credits available

Recommendation: Completion of Biotechnology or Biology

 

This course is a continuation of Biomedical Science. The main focus of this course will be biotechnology laboratory skills, DNA manipulation, independent experimentation, bioethics, and exploration of careers in the research/medical field. In addition, students will work with industry mentors to complete a culminating project that will be showcased at the annual Northwest Association of Biomedical Research Bio Expo competition. A field trip to explore the University of Washington Medical Center (depending on space availability) will also take place earlier in the year.

 


SCC100 - CHEMISTRY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Lab Science, 3rd Credit of Science

Recommendation: Completion or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or Algebra II/Trig

 

Chemistry is the study of matter and the chemical reactions between substances.  This course is aligned to the NGSS (WSSLS) high school performance expectations for physical science and also integrates climate change and mineral resource issues.  The major content of the course will center on the nature of matter and the changes it undergoes at the atomic level. Students will engage in both science and engineering practices as they learn about the content and relate them to the cross-cutting concepts of science.  

 


SCC160 - AP CHEMISTRY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Lab Science, 3rd Credit of Science

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP Chemistry test in the spring.

Recommendation: Completion of Chemistry

           

AP Chemistry will delve more deeply into the concepts covered in first year chemistry.  This class will cover the same materials as is covered in Chemistry 140-160 at the University of Washington (and most other college General Chemistry courses).  The class will pick up where Chemistry left off, moving quickly into the application of equilibrium concepts to gaseous, ionic and acid-base systems.  The course will prepare the students to take the AP Chemistry exam in the spring.

 


SCP100 - PHYSICS

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Lab Science, 3rd Credit of Science

Recommendation: Completion of Algebra 1 or higher

 

This course is aligned to the NGSS (WSSLS) high school performance expectations for physical science and also integrates astronomy.  The major content of the course will center on exploring motion, forces, energy and waves. Students will engage in both science and engineering practices as they learn about the content and relate them to the cross-cutting concepts of science.  

 


SCP181 - AP PHYSICS 1

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Lab Science, 3rd Credit of Science

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP Physics 1 test in the spring.

Recommendation: Completion or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or Algebra II/Trig

 

AP Physics 1 is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics.  The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound.  It will also introduce electric circuits. This course will prepare students to take the AP Physics I exam in the spring.

 


SCP182 - AP PHYSICS 2

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:   3rd Credit of Science, 3rd Credit of Math

Prerequisite: Completion of AP Physics 1 or Physics

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP Physics 2 test in the spring.

AP Physics 2 is the equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics.  The course covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; and atomic and nuclear physics.

 


SCE200 - AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Lab Science, 3rd Credit of Science

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP Environmental Science test in the spring.

AP Environmental Science is open to all students.  The class will provide students with an understanding of the scientific principles that govern interrelationships in the natural world. Important environmental issues will be explored and the comparative risks of known and potential problems will be evaluated. Specific focus on finding solutions to current and future challenges will be highlighted. This course meets college entrance requirements for an algebra-based science.

 


SCF200 - FORENSICS

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Lab Science, 3rd Credit of Science

 

This hands-on course focuses on solving problems by using scientific thinking and skills to interpret forensic evidence at a crime scene.  As such, basic principles from biology, chemistry, and physics will be used to illustrate the use of science to address real-world situations.  The course includes the study of related issues such as rules of evidence and case studies of the use and misuse of forensic evidence.


SCM100 - MARINE BIOLOGY

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Lab Science, 3rd Credit of Science

 

This course explores marine biodiversity and how organisms have adapted to the physical and chemical pro­cesses of the oceans and each other. Current environmental and political issues that affect the health of the world’s oceans and Puget Sound are also examined.

 

Content: Units include the composition of seawater, tides, currents and the types of marine habitats, oceanography, and human impacts. It also includes the classification, natural history, identification, and special adaptations of marine organisms. Students will practice observation skills, listening and reading comprehension, dissection, chart interpretation, data analysis, classification, and identification of specimens. Good attendance is required for lecture notes and laboratory work. Homework will include reading and summarizing articles, solving problems, completing class work, and Internet research. Students will learn to identify local species and tropical species at the Seattle Aquarium.

 


SCZ100 - ZOOLOGY

Length/Credit: One Semester/0.5 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: Lab Science, 3rd Credit of Science

This course explores the natural history of animals, concentrating on behavioral, ecological, and physiological adaptations of the major groups of animals, including Pacific Northwest species.

Content: Units include the natural history of the major groups of animals, taxonomy, survey of animal phyla, adaptations, the human use of and impact on animal resources, and extinction. Students will practice observation skills, listening and reading comprehension, dissection, data analysis, classification, and identification of specimens. Good attendance is required for lecture notes and laboratory work. Homework will include reading and summarizing articles, solving problems, completing class work, and Internet research. Students will also complete individual and group projects.


SCH200 - INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN ANATOMY

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:   Lab Science, 3rd Credit of Science

 

This is a course open to students who are interested in a career in cosmetology, fitness training, health care support occupations, massage therapy, and sports medicine.  The structure and function of the human body is the focus of study.  Concepts are supported by extensive lab and dissection activities.

Social Studies

SOCIAL STUDIES

Social Studies education helps students understand the world, develop critical thinking and analytic skills, and become thoughtful and responsible citizens. Social Studies is the study of relationships among people and between people and the environment over time, and it helps students recognize the challenges and benefits of living in a diverse society. Based on appropriate investigations and reflections within social studies, students develop distinctive skills and a critical awareness of the human condition and emerging spatial patterns and the processes and events that shape them. The Social Studies curriculum builds the following capacities in young people: disciplinary knowledge; inquiry, interpersonal, and critical thinking skills; respect for the underlying values of a diverse democratic society; interest in public affairs and competencies of self-government. Each capacity contributes uniquely to a common understanding of responsible citizenship.


SSG440 - AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY +

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 9

Diploma Category:  Flexible Credit

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP Human Geography test in the spring.

This course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface.  Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences.  They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications.   In addition, this course will focus on reading, writing, and study skills to help prepare students to be successful in high school and beyond.  AP Human Geography addresses the Common Core State Standards for History, prepares students for the Smarter Balanced State Assessments, and establishes the skills necessary for a successful progression of learning to the next grade level of Social Studies coursework.

 


SSW125 - WORLD HISTORY

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10

Diploma Category:  World History

Students will explore and analyze world events in this survey course spanning 1450-to the present. Major units of study include: Global expansion, the Age of Revolutions, international conflicts, the emergence and development of new nations, and the economic, technological, political, social, and geographic causes of change.  These topics will be explored through the use of textbooks, primary source documents, scholarly readings, speeches, short stories, and political cartoons.  The goal of the World History course is to prepare students to participate in a pluralistic, democratic society through understanding multiple perspectives, respecting various cultures, and recognizing their role in a global economy.  

 

This course addresses the Common Core State Standards for History, prepares students for the Smarter Balanced State Assessments, and establishes the skills necessary for a successful progression of learning to the next grade level of Social Studies coursework.

 


SSW205 - AP WORLD HISTORY

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: World History

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP World History test in the spring.

This is a college level yearlong course designed to develop greater understanding of global history; the study of human interactions and their consequences throughout history. This class begins its study in ancient history and ends with an investigation of present day global relations. Students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to pass the AP World History exam, which will enable them to earn college credit.

 


SSU300 - UNITED STATES HISTORY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 11

Diploma Category:  US History 11

This graduation requirement focuses on the US Constitution and the relationship of historical events to the political, social and economic ideas that have shaped our country since Industrialization. Students will learn to assess historical materials – their relevance in relation to class discussions, media information, research materials and instructor input.

 


APH200 - AP UNITED STATES HISTORY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 11

Diploma Category:  US History 11

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP US History test in the spring.

The AP program in United States History is designed to provide students with analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history.  This program prepares students for immediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those of full – year introductory college courses.  This accelerated survey course will cover topics from the Age of Discovery to the present. AP US History students may take the AP exam in May to earn college credit.

 


SSM401 – AP EUROPEAN HISTORY

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: H1

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP European History test in the spring.

Study will begin with the Renaissance, focus on major events and conclude with modern times.  Because of the emphasis on preparation for the AP Exam and the resulting potential college credit, work levels will be more demanding and only motivated students should take this class.  AP European History is an accelerated class that prepares the student to take the AP European

History test in the spring.


SSG430 - CONTEMPORARY NATIONAL/WORLD ISSUES

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 12

Diploma Category:  Contemporary National/World Issues

Seniors are required to take Contemporary National/World Issues, a full year course that covers both Global Studies and Civics. Global Studies will emphasize the study of current, cultural, economic, environmental, political and religious conflicts around the world. Civics surveys political and economic issues at the local, state and national level. Topics include:

·       Federal, state, and local government organization and procedures;

·       Rights and responsibilities of citizens addressed in the Washington state and United States Constitutions;

·       Current issues addressed at each level of government; and

·       Electoral issues, including elections, ballot measures, initiatives, and referenda.

Students will develop their analyzing and problem solving skills as a preparation for becoming informed and productive citizens. This course meets the following graduation requirements for social studies: 1 semester of Civics and 1 full year of Contemporary National/World Issues.


SSG422 - AP US GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 12

Diploma Category:  Contemporary National/World Issues

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP US Government & Politics test in the spring.

This course provides both a study of broad, general concepts of the United States political system, as well as the analysis of specific case studies. Basic concepts include the Constitutional basis of US Government, political ideals and behaviors, the political party system, institutions of the national government, public policy and civil rights/liberties. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills, essay writing and interpretation of original documents. This course meets the following graduation requirements for social studies: 1 semester of Civics and 1 full year of Contemporary National/World Issues. Students who take this course are encouraged to take the AP exam in May for college credit.

 


CHS410 - INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES (Formerly Global Issues)

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grade: 12

Diploma Category:  Contemporary National/World Issues

This yearlong, 100-level college course introduces students to Global Studies by exploring comparative government, economic systems, globalization, conflict and genocide, the legacy of colonialism, and the role of international organizations in peaceful conflict resolution.  We will also examine topics in human rights, global citizenship, the relationship between humans and environmental change, and sustainable development.

Students are expected to have read the assigned material each night and to come to class ready to discuss both domestic and international events and political news every day.  The instructor's role is to assist in expanding students' abilities to think independently, encourage informed civic participation, and strengthen research and literacy skills.

Students who perform at college level expectations on several course assignments may apply for Cascadia Community College credit. Only highly motivated students are encouraged to enroll. This course meets the following graduation requirements for social studies: 1 semester of Civics and 1 full year of Contemporary National/World Issues.


SSA400 - AP ART HISTORY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Flexible Credit

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP Art History test in the spring.

Advanced Placement Art History is a challenging and exciting course for students. The class is designed to introduce students to the understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of works of art. The class study begins with the ancient world and continues through the current day. We will cover the development of artistic styles, major movements and figures, mediums and techniques, architecture, and make relevant historical connections. No experience is necessary, but this is a college level class and a student should be prepared for an increased workload.


APP100 - AP PSYCHOLOGY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Flexible Credit

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP Psychology test in the spring.

The Advanced Placement Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of human mental processes and behavior. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology (such as: history and approaches, research methods, biology and behavior, learning and cognition, developmental and abnormal psychology, and social psychology). Students will also learn about careers in psychology and the pathways to additional training. This course is equivalent to an introductory college course in psychology. As a college level course, AP Psychology is best suited for students willing to apply themselves to the study of interesting and sometimes challenging material.   

Special Education

SPECIAL EDUCATION

 

Students in special education will participate in classes as determined in collaboration with their IEP team.  Courses will be decided based upon a student’s need for specially designed instruction.  Students are also expected to meet all graduation requirements including full credits, state assessments, and high school and beyond plan.  Some students may qualify for modifications in state assessments and modified credit expectations as noted on their IEPs.

 

GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSES WITH ACCOMMODATIONS

Special education students can participate in general education classes with accommodations. An accommodation is an adjustment to the learning environment or in the delivery of instruction. The difference is “how” we teach.  Accommodations do not change the course expectations and are provided without impacting the course code for the class.

 

GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSES WITH MODIFICATIONS

Special education students can participate in general education classes with modifications.  A modification is a change in what is expected from a student. The difference is in “what” we teach.  It is altering the content, performance criteria, or instructional level.   Modifications require a change in the course code and will no longer meet the college Hec B requirements.

 

LEARNING CENTER (LC) CLASSES

Learning Center classes are exclusively for students in special education.  Learning Center courses replace general education core content classes in Math and Language Arts.  These classes have combinations of altered content knowledge, conceptual difficulty, educational goals and instructional methods different than those applied in general education classes.  These classes have special education course codes.

 

ACADEMIC LAB CLASSES

Academic Lab classes are exclusively for students in special education.  These classes are designed to allow students to receive specially designed instruction as outlined on their IEPs including reading, writing, math, social skills, behavior, and study skills/organization.

 

CO-TEACHING CLASSES

Some schools offer co-taught classes.  While there are varying co-teaching models these classes are generally taught by both a highly qualified general education teacher as well as a special education teacher in a specific subject area such as Science, Math, Language Arts, or Social Studies.  If the special education student in this class has accommodations, they will have a general education course code.  If they have modifications, they will have a special education course code.

 

ASPIRE PROGRAM (FORMERLY PBS)

Some schools have specially designed behavior programs for students that require support in the areas of behavior, social skills and social-emotional needs.  These programs are currently located at Canyon Park, Timbercrest, Northshore, Woodinville, Bothell, and Inglemoor.  Courses offered in these programs are noted with special education course codes.

 

MID LEVEL (ML) CLASSES*

Mid-Level classes are exclusively for students in special education.   These classes are designed for students with significant academic delays and possible cognitive and adaptive skill delays.  These classes are meant to replace core content classes in Math and Language Arts.  Students access alternative curriculums and smaller classes in order to gain knowledge and skills in these areas.

 

*Note on Science and Social Studies:  Special education students need to participate in Science and Social Studies courses taught by Highly Qualified teachers and access the general education curriculum (can be modified).   The only exceptions are students with intellectual impairments that will have IEP determined diploma requirements.

 

FUNCTIONAL SKILLS AND ACADEMICS (FSA) CLASSES

FSA classes are exclusively for students in special education.  These classes are designed for students with intellectual impairments and delays in adaptive skills.  These course focus on functional academics and life skills.  Students access alternative curriculums and smaller classes in order to develop functional skills and independence.

 

The Arts

THE ARTS

Through taking fine arts classes at Woodinville High School, students will develop visual or performance art skills and techniques. Within all the art classes, students’ creativity will be enriched through exploring different topics and media within a collaborative classroom setting. We have a wide range of visual and performance art classes from which to choose.

The Arts Courses

Performing Arts

PERFORMING ARTS


MUS350 - AP MUSIC THEORY

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP Music Theory test in the spring.

The AP Music Theory class will be offered to all students who wish to further their understanding of reading music as well as listening to music. This class focuses on music literacy, and goes in-depth on how the formulation of written music progressed throughout history. If you appreciate wonderful music, wish to become a better musician, or want to sign-up for an AP class that involves listening to music, then this is the class for you. We will practice analyzing sheet music, reading musical notation, listening and responding to music, and even compose original music.


MUV120 - CONCERT VOICES (Formerly Concert Choir)

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Do you love to sing? Are you interested in the Performing Arts, but don’t know where to start? Concert Voices is the place for you. This group of mixed voices (men and women, soprano/alto/tenor/bass) sings exciting music from all over the world, popular music, and traditional music throughout the year. Concert Voices includes students who have never sang before, and students that have been in choir for all four years of high school. There is no singing experience necessary. Students in Concert Voices start with learning how to read one melody of music, and quickly learn how to read four-part harmony. We travel to places like California, Canada, New York City, etc. and compete in competitions, go on rehearsal retreats, organize performing gigs, perform in concerts, and so much more. Concert Voices is open to all who want to learn how to better their singing voice.


 


MUV160 - BEL CANTO CHOIR

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite:   Informal voice check-in

Bel Canto is a group of high voices (sopranos and altos) who are highly skilled in vocal technique and musical ability. Bel Canto is a highly competitive group, and has the opportunity to travel and compete against other schools. This class introduces more complex musical practices like singing in four to eight-part harmony, sight-singing music, and being involved in many community performances. Bel Canto explores more diverse cultures, irregular and difficult rhythmic meters, and requires accurate vocal control. This group performs at all events that Concert Voices is involved in, as well as additional collegiate festivals, holiday gigs, assemblies, State Solo and Ensemble Contest, and more.


MUV220 - VARSITY VOICES (Formerly Advanced Mixed Choir)

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite:  Informal voice check-in

Varsity Voices is a blend between solo voice lessons, a vocal a cappella group, and a traditional choir. These students will be featured in solo concerts, singing popular music from various decades, genres, and styles. The Varsity Voices will have the opportunity of singing music of their own choice in solos, duets, trios, etc. Have you sung in a vocal group or choir before, but want to showcase your solo voice more often? Even if you have never sung in a school group before, you can audition to be in the Varsity Voices. This group gets students involved in eight-part harmony, explores every genre from Renaissance to hip-hop, and reads music at a high pace. Varsity Voices performs at concerts with Bel Canto and Concert Voices, but also presents solo acts at Open Mic Nights, the NSD Holiday Luncheon, the Fairmont Hotel in downtown Seattle, and more! If you have interest in being featured as one of Woodinville High School’s featured soloists, as well as sing alongside some other awesome musicians in this class, please meet with Mr. Cole for an audition.  


MUB100 - SYMPHONIC BAND

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: The Arts

Prerequisite:   Experience on a wind instrument or by teacher permission

Symphonic Band is designed to provide students with an introduction to high school level wind band literature. Students will develop performing skills through the exploration of a wide variety of exciting repertoire including marching, concert, and chamber music. Symphonic Band performs at all school concerts, Northlake League band festivals, Solo & Ensemble, sporting/pep events, and other festivals that may involve evening and weekend performances.  


MUJ100 - JAZZ ENSEMBLE

Length/Credit:  Full Year /1 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite: By audition only. Must be concurrently enrolled in the school’s band, orchestra or choral large ensemble class

Jazz Ensemble is a course designed to explore and develop skills in the ever-expanding genre of jazz music. Students will have the opportunity to play exciting music ranging from traditional big band swing to Latin, funk, and even rock styles. This class will also develop critical musical skills such as ear training, improvisation, and basic music theory. Jazz Ensemble performs at all school concerts, Northlake League jazz festivals, and other festivals that may involve evening and weekend performances.


MUP300 - PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Emphasis is on the uniqueness of percussion performance (Concert and Marching) as well as developing individual musical maturity, responsibility, and proficiency on percussion instruments. The beginning of the year will focus on skills related to the marching band percussion section. The focus will then shift towards the role of the percussion section in band as well as the development of percussion ensembles. Attendance is required for all events that involve Marching Band, Concert Band, Pep Band, and Percussion Ensemble.  The Percussion Ensemble performs at all school concerts, Northlake League band festivals, Solo & Ensemble and other festivals that may involve evening and weekend performances.


MUB300 - WIND ENSEMBLE

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite: By audition only

Wind Ensemble is Woodinville High School’s premiere wind band. In this class, students will be challenged with engaging and diverse music experiences including marching band, wind band literature, and pep band. This course is designed to develop advanced performing skills and performs at all school concerts, Northlake League band festivals, Solo & Ensemble, sporting/pep events, and other festivals that may involve evening and weekend performances.  


MUO100 - STRING ORCHESTRA

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite:  Experience on an orchestra string instrument or by teacher permission

In String Orchestra, string students are introduced to exciting new music that challenges them as a stepping stone towards Chamber Orchestra. Performing skills are developed through playing a variety of string repertoire ranging from classical to modern styles in both string and full orchestra settings. String Orchestra performs at all school concerts, Northlake League orchestra festivals, Solo & Ensemble, and other festivals that may involve evening and weekend performances. 


MUO150 - CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite: By audition only (audition in spring)

Chamber Orchestra is the premiere string orchestra at WHS. The class develops advanced performing skills through a wide variety of fun and challenging musical literature, including both string orchestra and full orchestra pieces. Chamber Orchestra performs at all school concerts, Northlake League orchestra festivals, Solo & Ensemble, and other festivals that may involve evening and weekend performances.  


MUG110 - GUITAR

Length/Credit: One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

This course is for all students, including those with no prior formal music training and may include such guitar styles as blues/rock, folk or classical. Beginning students receive group instruction on basic guitar skills. As students advance in guitar skills, they are assigned more advanced books or independent study.  Students must provide their own guitar and method book.


MUG155 - ADVANCED GUITAR

Length/Credit: One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

This class is for students who have taken at least one semester of guitar at WHS or have taken at least one year of private guitar lessons. Depending on ability, students will be placed at level two or three and will learn basic and advanced chord concepts and/or blues rock improvisation skills. This class is not for beginners. Students must provide their own guitar and method book.


MUP200 - PIANO LAB

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: The Arts

This class is for the student who wants to learn to play the piano. It will include keyboard skills as well as a theory component to enable students to understand the elements of reading music.  Grading is based upon daily participation and playing and written tests.


MUP200ADVANCED PIANO LAB

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: The Arts

Prerequisite: Piano Lab

This class is for students who have taken at least one semester of piano at WHS or have taken at least one year of private piano lessons.  This class is not for beginners.  Grading is based upon daily participation, playing and written tests.

Theatrical Arts

THEATRICAL ARTS


DRA135 - INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11

Diploma Category: The Arts

This class is designed to lay the foundation for acting by developing skills in movement, improvisation and character development.


DRA235 - INTERMEDIATE ACTING

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Intermediate Acting will encourage students to think and work creatively in both individual and ensemble projects. The course focuses on stage acting, and the scene work for this class will be pulled from a diverse range of cultural and historical resources allowing the student to experience many forms of the dramatic arts. Intermediate Acting is a perfect follow-up to Introduction to Theatre or for students who have already had some theatre experience. Students may repeat Intermediate Acting.


DRA335 - ADVANCED ACTING

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite:  Audition required

In Advanced Acting students will learn the combination of skills that are necessary to create and present a variety of stage productions that include monologues, one-acts, and stage plays. This course is for actors involved in the presentation of various school play performances during the year. Students may repeat Advanced Acting.


DRA300 - TECHNICAL THEATRE

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: The Arts, Career & Technical Education

This course will teach design principles and construction techniques to be used in a hands-on approach to production.  Students will be involved in various aspects of backstage work for school productions. Students may repeat Technical Theatre.


DRA300 – ADVANCED TECHNICAL THEATRE

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: The Arts, Career & Technical Education

Prerequisite: at least one semester of Technical Theatre

A continuation of the work of technical theatre, with a focus on depth and breadth of knowledge. Students will take leadership roles in group work, and crew head responsibilities. Areas of study include scenic construction and design, lighting design, audio design, costume construction and design, and scenic rigging. Students are expected to work backstage during at least one production during each semester.

Visual Arts

VISUAL ARTS

Through taking visual arts classes at Woodinville High School, students will develop and strengthen their abilities to successfully use a wide variety of media, deepen their understanding of how the visual arts affect our world, be introduced to an exciting range of current and past artists who have made a powerful impact on humanity and of course develop the skills to communicate visually throughout a variety of mediums.


ART115 - BEGINNING ART

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

No experience necessary.  This beginning course is a great place to start learning drawing skills and introduces students to the principles of successful design. Students will have fun exploring a wide variety of materials including pencil, pen and ink, color pencil, mixed media and oil pastel through hands-on experience.


AIA100 - INTERMEDIATE ART

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit (see note below)

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite: Beginning Art

Beginning art or a portfolio review by WHS art teachers is recommended.  Intermediate Art is for the student who would like to continue to develop their abilities and expand their interest in art.   Projects are designed to build and expand student’s drawing and design skills while developing their creativity and personal expression through the use of color in a variety of media, which may include painting with acrylic & water color, charcoal, conte, mixed media, printmaking, 3-D design, oil pastel, chalk pastel.  


AAA150 - ADVANCED ART

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: The Arts

Prerequisite: Intermediate Art

This yearlong course is designed for students who have taken Beginning &/or Intermediate Art and want to develop an art portfolio. In a supportive environment, students will engage with peers & teacher to investigate & develop personal style and expression. Assignments will include work from life, imagination and personal expression.  Learn to express yourself visually!  


ACE100 - CERAMICS

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

This course is designed to introduce students to the many aspects of clay.  Students will learn many aspects of design and construction including the hand building processes and work on the potter’s wheel.  After creating projects, students will explore glazing and firing processes.


ACE150 - ADVANCED CERAMICS

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite:  Ceramics

Continue your journey in clay with Advanced Ceramics.  Using knowledge of techniques learned in Beginning Ceramics, students will work on specific projects that may include a tile mirror, teapot, more sculptural work, introduction to working with plaster molds to create pieces and another turn at the wheel.  This class is a little more individual, however, so the student also has more input to projects of their choice.


APA150 - AP STUDIO ART

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite(s): Advanced Art or Art Teacher permission required with presentation of Art Portfolio

Other Info: Students submit a portfolio for evaluation in the spring.

The AP Studio Art program makes it possible for highly motivated high school students to do college level artwork.  During this yearlong course each student will submit a portfolio of 24 works for evaluation at the end of the semester and will prepare their portfolios throughout the year.  AP Studio teaches the development of concepts, composition, and drawing techniques to create a portfolio for college entrance. A concentration on works based on the student's individual interest in a particular area, and focuses on the process of investigation, growth, and discovery.  Students will focus on the 2-D portfolio options incorporating media such as Drawing, Painting, Collage, Printmaking, and Mixed Media Artwork.  This class may be repeated multiple times.


APA155 - AP STUDIO ART: 2-D Design Portfolio

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite(s): AP Studio Art Drawing, Advanced Art or Art Teacher permission required with presentation of Art Portfolio

Other Info: Students submit a portfolio for evaluation in the spring.

This yearlong course is designed for the serious art student who is interested in the pursuit of college level artistic development and in art as a possible career. AP Studio Art: 2-D Design is an intensive investigation of art concepts, media and techniques after completing the AP Studio Art: Drawing Portfolio (and optionally after taking Advanced Art). This class will offer students the opportunity to further master their skills in communicating concepts visually, developing their artistic voice, creating strong compositions and increasing techniques in various art media that emphasize the effective utilization of the Principles of Art and Design. Students will submit a portfolio to the College Board in the spring which emphasizes an innovative Concentration of work and showcases a variety of diverse artmaking techniques.


AGD100 – GRAPHIC DESIGN

Length/Credit: One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Drawing/Design

Diploma Category: The Arts

 

Learn modern graphic design techniques, including basic Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign and Bridge programs. Computerized type, layout and production projects include letterform, editorial imaging (such as anti-racism material), travel posters, fashion design, food labels, marketing materials, magazine spreads, text portraits, etc.

 


AMD100 - METAL DESIGN

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit                  

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Students will have the opportunity to develop & apply successful design skills to make metal artworks.  Students learn metalsmithing skills used in the creation of jewelry and small-scale sculptures using brass, copper, and silver.  Through hands-on experience students will learn how to drill, saw, file, solder & polish metals.  This engaging class will challenge & develop your problem-solving skills.


AMD150 - ADVANCED METAL DESIGN

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit                  

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite:  Metal Design

Students who have taken Beginning Metal Design will continue to learn & explore more advanced metalsmithing techniques. Skills will include stone setting, casting, & marriage of metals.  Through hands-on & collaborative work students will have the opportunity for more personal expression & open-ended designs.  This class may be repeated multiple times.


VWE302WELDING SCULPTURE

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grade level: 11, 12

The focus of both the welding industry and sculpture is fabrication. Sculpture requires artists to use materials, tools and skills and creates a natural environment for artists and the welding industry to merge. The welding sculpture class allows aspiring welders to gain the knowledge and skills needed in today's art world and welding industry.

Students will learn basic and advanced skills in welding, as well as many fabrication techniques used in today's industry. Students learn how to think and work creatively with these processes and how to conceptually and objectively discuss their work. This class creates an artistic option for CTE or Art Credit. 


APH100 - PHOTOGRAPHY

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category: The Arts

Other Info: It is recommended that each student provides his/her own manually adjustable digital camera

Do you like to take pictures? In this class you will 1) Learn how to use an adjustable camera with shutter speed and aperture settings to take quality photos without a flash; 2) Learn how to see through the lens creatively to take artistic photos, not just snapshots. Students should be prepared to spend out-of-class time shooting their photos. The opportunity to use film and print in the darkroom is also available. (Schools without access to darkrooms will focus on digital photography).


APH150 - ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite: Photography

Other Info: It is recommended that each student provides his/her own manually adjustable digital camera

Advanced Photography is offered to students who have had the beginning class and are enthusiastic about spending more time doing photography.  Assignments will focus on learning new techniques and improving technical skills as well as special effects.


ASG100 - STAINED GLASS

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Learn the ancient and contemporary skills of designing and constructing glass windows and decorations.  Lead and copper foil techniques for assembling glass projects will be emphasized.  Students will use their design skills to plan and assemble required projects.  Glass fusing and slumping will be introduced.


ASG150 - ADVANCED STAINED GLASS

Length/Credit:  One Semester/.5 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  The Arts

Prerequisite:  Stained Glass

More glass artists live in the greater Seattle area than any other place across the globe.  This class is offered as an extension of Stained Glass.  The instructor will emphasize the artistic approach of using glass as a means for personal expression.  Techniques will include fusing, slumping, glass painting, etching, mosaics, lead construction, copper foil and glass combing.

World Languages

WORLD LANGUAGES

World Language is an academic, college preparatory program requiring a considerable amount of home study and a positive attitude to succeed. Northshore School District offers advanced courses in select languages at the International Baccalaureate, Advanced Placement, and College in The High School level. If a student does not complete two years of a foreign language as a part of their graduation requirements, they will then need to complete two PPR (Personalized Pathway) courses. Completion of two years of one foreign language sequence may be required for entrance into four-year colleges/ universities. Many universities recommend at least three years of language study.

1ST YEAR LANGUAGE

Heritage speakers and students coming from the dual language program at Woodin Elementary may be able to start above the 100 level, depending on their language skills.

WLF100 - FRENCH 100

WLG100 - GERMAN 100

WLJ100 - JAPANESE 100

WLS100 - SPANISH 100

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11

Diploma Category:  Flexible Credit

A beginning course to introduce the basics of the language as well as the culture through simulated real life situations, music, games, storytelling and other activities. The goal for year-end will be that students have gained a working vocabulary and grammar basis to facilitate communication in the language. Skills emphasized will be: listening, oral communication, reading and writing.


WLX100 - AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 100

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  9, 10, 11

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Other Info:  Up to 5 college credits available.

This college level course, ASL 100, is the complex and natural existing language used by the Deaf.  ASL 100 will introduce students to this visual / gestural language and to the Deaf community.  In this class students will learn vocabulary and the grammar of ASL through natural everyday conversation, situations, and activities.  Classrooms operate in large and small group settings and often in full immersion.  Students must be able to maintain eye contact and be visually focused.  Also having the ability to work regularly with recording devices (by uploading and downloading media) for portfolio purposes.  College credit is granted to those who earn the grade of “B or above.

2ND YEAR LANGUAGE

WLF200 - FRENCH 200

WLG200 - GERMAN 200

WLJ200 - JAPANESE 200

WLS200 - SPANISH 200

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Flexible Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of the 100 level course of the selected language

In these second-year courses students will expand their knowledge and fluency of the language by increasing their vocabulary base and expanding their ability to read and write in the language. The goal for the year-end will be that students have expanded their conversation skills, grammar, reading and writing skills to an intermediate level. Skills emphasized will be, listening, reading and writing as well as oral communication.


WLX200 - AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 200

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Prerequisite: Completion of ASL 100

Other Info:  Up to 5 college credits available.

ASL 200 expands on vocabulary, depends complex grammatical understanding, functional application, Deaf history, culture and community. Second year will focus more on classifiers, use of spatial referencing, role-shifting, signer’s point of view, verb inflections and the Greater Deaf community (agencies serving the Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing).  Using dialogues and narratives while continuing their virtual portfolios students will grow in their fluency, prosody, and confidence.  College credit is granted to those who earn the grade of “B or above.”

3RD YEAR LANGUAGE

WLS300 - SPANISH 300

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Flexible Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of the 200 level course of the selected language

In this third-year course students will be engaged in a variety of activities to develop skills in every aspect of the language. Short stories, skits and role-playing, poems, magazine and newspaper articles, audio and video sources are used to encourage learning. The class is conducted in a semi-immersion environment and the students are encouraged to employ the language as much as possible. The goal for year-end will be that students will have developed a basic proficiency in the language.


WLX300 - AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 300

Length/Credit:  Full Year/1 Credit

Grades:  11, 12

Diploma Category:  Career & Technical Education

Prerequisite: Completion of the ASL 200

ASL 300 continues vocabulary and grammatical structure of the language with storytelling, narratives, and dialogues.  While continuing an exposure to Deaf history, culture, and community, students will also explore Deaf folklore, current events and Deaf-related topics, Deaf-Blind community, mock interpreting simulations, poetry, iconic art, and careers with ASL. College credit is granted to those who earn the grade of “B or above.”


WLJ300 - JAPANESE 300

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Flexible Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of the 200 level course of the selected language

Other Info:  University of Washington college credit available

In this third-year course students will be engaged in a variety of activities to develop skills in every aspect of the language. Short stories, skits and role-playing, poems, magazine and newspaper articles, audio and video sources are used to encourage learning. The class is conducted in an immersion environment and the students are encouraged to employ the language as much as possible. The goal for year-end will be that students will have developed a basic proficiency in the language.


CHS806 - ELEMENTARY FRENCH (French 350)

CHS817 - FIRST YEAR GERMAN (German 350)

CHS836 - ELEMENTARY SPANISH (Spanish 350)

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Flexible Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of the 200 level course of the selected language

Other info: 9th grade students may enroll in this course, but are not eligible for college credit

The University of Washington, as part of their College in the High School programs will offer their 103 level course as a third year language course option. After paying the class tuition and successfully completing the course sophomores, juniors and seniors may earn 5 UW credits transferable to most 4-year colleges in the nation. These courses all entail the exclusive use of the studied language in the classroom with an emphasis on communication skills, interactive presentation of grammar and daily practice outside of class.

4TH YEAR LANGUAGE

WLF410 - AP FRENCH

WLF450 - AP GERMAN

WLS410 - AP SPANISH

WLJ500 - AP JAPANESE

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 10, 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Flexible Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of the 350 level course of the selected language

Other Info: Students are encouraged to take the AP French Language & Culture, or AP German Language & Culture, AP Japanese Language & Culture or AP Spanish Language & Culture test in the spring.

The AP curriculum focuses on interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational skills about global topics in French, German, Japanese or Spanish. Students will be prepared for success on the AP exam in May and overall fluency in the respective language. Each class is conducted entirely in French, German, Japanese or Spanish. The five Cs of language learning (Communication, Connections, Cultures, Comparisons and Communities) will be practiced regularly as students become familiar with the six themes of the AP Language and Culture course.  The themes are as follows: Global Challenges, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Personal and Public Identities, Families and Communities and Beauty and Aesthetics. Students’ language skills will be ameliorated by writing regularly in a variety of formats, participating in class and small group discussions, listening to French, German, Japanese or Spanish-language music and news stories and reading texts from the French, German, Japanese or Spanish-speaking world.

5TH YEAR LANGUAGE

WLS500 - SPANISH 500

Length/Credit: Full Year/1 Credit

Grades: 11, 12

Diploma Category:  Flexible Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 400

In this fifth-year course, students will build on their knowledge of advanced grammar, communication, and culture in a total immersion environment. By reading novels, watching film, taking film trips while immersed in the language, developing and implementing lessons for dual language students at Woodin Elementary, and having video chats with high school students from other Spanish-speaking countries, students will be able to apply their advanced skills to the real world while making comparisons from their own cultures, to those in the Spanish-speaking world.

General Information

Schedule Change Policy

It is critical that the choices made by students during registration are considered to be final.  Courses that are offered and staffing for the following year are based on the choices students make during the registration process.

  • Schedule changes may be made on a limited basis for the following reasons:
  • A graduation requirement must be added.
  • A student does not have the skills to continue in a yearlong class.
  • Administrative withdrawal is requested.
  • Incomplete Schedule
  • Duplicate classes/obvious errors
  • IEP/ELL placement issues
  • Any schedule change that does not meet these criteria is subject to administrative approval.  

Semester course changes may be allowed within the first 10 days of a term without penalty.  Changes after the 10th day may be considered when extenuating circumstances exist.  After the tenth (10th) day, courses dropped will be graded “F”. Yearlong classes will not be dropped at any time during the year unless there are extenuating circumstances approved by the principal.  Yearlong classes are exactly that:  Yearlong.  Students will not be granted permission to withdraw from a class unless they do not have the skills to continue.  The student must attend summer school or make an alternative arrangement in order to meet graduation requirements.

Waiver of Graduation Requirements

Policy for Exemption from Physical Education (PE) Portion (1.0 credit) of the Health & Fitness Requirement (2.0 credits)

Schools shall emphasize the worth of physical education, and carry into effect physical education requirements, provided that individual students may be exempted from participating in physical education that otherwise is required on account of physical disability, employment or religious belief, or because of participation in school-directed athletics or military science and tactics, or for other good cause.  (Washington State Law)

Health and Fitness requirements:

  • HF1 = .50 credit of Life Fitness
  • HF2 = 1.0 credit of PE 9-12
  • HF3 = .50 credit of Health

Life Fitness and Health cannot be waived with sports waivers or course exemptions.

Northshore School District Procedure

Parent(s) must submit a written request for exemption from the physical education (PE) portion of the Health and Fitness requirements to the building administrator or his/her designee; the request may be granted for the reasons stated in the law set forth below:

  1. Students participating in high school athletic programs may waive up to 1.00 credit of PE 9-12 through sports participation.  Each athletic season = .25 credit waiver.  Life Fitness and Health cannot be waived through athletic participation.
  2. Students exempted from PE 9-12 requirement must substitute equivalency credits in accordance with NSD school board policies (see Page 9 for graduation requirements).
  3. Students in grade 9 may postpone PE 9-12 requirements until grades 10-12.
  4. Students may request an exemption from PE for medical reasons.  Medical exemptions must be verified by a physician.
  5. No Health and Fitness exemption will be granted for Running Start students.
  6. Other just cause.

Fees

In accordance with state law, the school district will provide each student with the materials and sup­plies necessary to learn the basic skills taught in their classes. However, many students desire to extend their creativity and educational experiences beyond the basics and many students wish to keep the projects they make in school. In these cases, special materials may be purchased at school, when available (project purchase fee), or brought from home or other sources. Other optional expenses associated with high school include: ASB membership, yearbook, school pictures, parking hanger, graduation supplies, etc. Fee waivers and reductions shall be granted for students whose families by reason of their income would have difficulty paying the full fee. The USDA Child Nutrition Program guidelines shall be used to determine qualification for waiver or reduction of fees.

Fines

It is the student’s responsibility to monitor the safekeeping of books, materials, and equipment issued by the school.  A student shall be responsible for the cost of replacing materials or property that are lost or damaged. In the event the student does not make proper restitution (or discharge the fine/charge through voluntary work obligation) the following may occur (per school board policy 3520):

  • Grades, transcripts, or diplomas may be withheld, including transcripts sent with college applications.
  • Students transferring to another school will have their official transcript withheld and the enrolling school will be notified of unpaid fines/fees.
  • The student may be held out of participation in extracurricular activities, including athletics.
  • Parking hangers may be withheld.
  • The student may have prepaid goods purchased from the district withheld including, but not limited to yearbooks, pictures, and optional graduation supplies.
  • The student may be held out of participation in optional school activities including dances and excursions.
  • The student may be held out of optional graduation ceremonies.
  • The student may be subject to other appropriate discipline.

Athletic Eligibility

The following criteria are required for a student to participate in high school athletics:

  • Be a resident of Northshore School District and living with parent/guardian.
  • Be enrolled in and passing five (5) subjects
  • Fall athletes must have passed 5 classes at the end of the previous spring term.
  • Students will be required to earn a minimum 2.0 GPA for the previous semester in order to achieve interscholastic eligibility.
  • Have a current physical examination on file in the activities/athletic office. Physicals are good for 2 years from the date of the doctor’s visit but must be valid through the sports season until the state playoffs of that sport.
  • Provide insurance company information or purchase insurance.
  • Purchase an ASB membership.
  • Be enrolled in a 6th period class during the season of sports participation. If the athlete participates in a winter sport, the athlete must be enrolled in a 6th period both semesters.
  • Participation fee must be paid within the first two weeks of participation. If the sport makes cuts, the fee is due after the athlete has made the team but within the first two weeks.
  • Fines must be paid.
  • Concussion and new sports specific guideline forms must be completed each sports season.

NCAA Freshman Athletic Eligibility

Students wishing to participate in college athletics at any level must meet certain minimum requirements. These requirements are specified by the NCAA Eligibility Center. Separate application to the NCAA is required before any scholarship or athletic recruitment can take place. It is the responsibility of each student to meet the requirements. For more information, visit the NCAA Eligibility Center website at www.ncaaclearinghouse.net or contact your counselor in the Counseling Department.

College Coursework

Disclaimer

Each college and university makes its own decisions with regards to awarding credit and placement for College in The High School, Advanced Placement, and International Baccalaureate courses.  Most institutions have a written policy that state minimum score requirements for college credit as well as how credits are applied. It is highly recommended that you check with the specific institution of your choice to learn more about how college credit can be earned and applied.

Advanced Placement

The Advanced Placement program is a cooperative educational endeavor between secondary schools, colleges and universities.  Challenging and complex subject matter across a wide spectrum of subject areas is presented in a discussion, lecture and testing format.  These classes offer college level content and possible college credit while students are still in high school.                                                    

AP Quick Facts

  • College credit is available for examinations successfully taken in high school.
  • Exempts students from some introductory college courses, thus permitting students to move more quickly into advanced classes.
  • Motivates students to attempt more challenging courses in both high school and college.
  • Develops the analytical and study skills required to succeed in college courses.
  • Reduces college costs and time to obtain a degree.
  • Provides direction in selecting college majors.
  • Learn more at https://ap.collegeboard.org or https://advancesinap.collegeboard.org/ap-capstone

College in the High School

Students have the opportunity to earn college credit in approved high school courses. Students may take the course for high school credit only, choosing not to pay the college/ university fee.  Students who choose to take the course for college/university credit, must pay the college/university fee and meet all content requirements in addition to high school course content.  Students earning college /university credits will receive a grade and transcript from the college/university. Specific information regarding the credit provider and fees will be provided by the class instructor. Contact your counselor for more information.

For a thorough explanation of the dual credit guidelines, please check out this OSPI link: http://www.k12.wa.us/DualCredit/default.aspx. In addition, the following webpage can provide students information on how WA State colleges apply the AP test scores: http://readysetgrad.org/rsg_cred_wiz/form

Tech Prep

The Tech Prep program provides students with the opportunity to earn community/technical college credit for certain high school courses.

High school students become eligible to earn community/technical college credit for their specific high school courses by:

  • Enrolling in a Tech Prep class
  • Registering for Tech Prep credit
  • Paying the consortium fee at http://pay.techprepcc.org (Cost may be subject to change.)
  • Completing their Tech Prep high school courses with a B grade or higher

Courses for which Tech Prep credit is available are noted with (TP Credit) on the diploma category line.  Additional information about approved Tech Prep programs is available from course instructors, your Career & College Counselor, or at www.TechPrepCC.org.

Running Start

Running Start is a program for juniors and seniors who want to earn college credits while in high school.  To be eligible for participation in the Running Start program, the entering student must have junior standing and have earned at least 10 credits.

Approved courses taken through Running Start at any community or technical college can earn both high school and college credit.  Only those courses numbering 100 or higher at the colleges are eligible for both high school and college credit. Students may enroll full or part-time in Running Start classes.

The number of funded Running Start classes is determined by the number of enrolled high school classes and may not exceed 1.2 total FTE.  (Refer to the chart below).  The dates of college quarters and the high school semesters do not always match.  When high school and Running Start classes overlap in January and March due to new college quarters beginning, students are expected to attend all high school courses.  High school courses take precedence over Running Start courses at the college during this overlap.

Running Start is not designed as a place for students to make up credit deficiencies.  Northshore School District pays the tuition, while students pay for books and fees.  Students must provide their own transportation to the college.  If a student drops a class, it is his/her responsibility to immediately notify the high school registrar and counselor of the dropped class.  Students must officially drop the class through the college.  At the college, students will be enrolled in regular classes with adult students where attendance is not taken and students are responsible for their own actions and participation.  Running Start students are responsible for monitoring their own progress towards graduation and keeping informed of school activities and deadlines.

High School Classes

RS College Level Credits

None or 1 class

15 credits

2 classes

12 credits

3 classes

10 credits

4 classes

6 credits

5 or more classes

3 credits

 

College & Career Center

Resources

The College & Career Center is a unique and valuable area within the Woodinville High School Counseling Department.  Open to all students and parents, the College & Career Center provides many resources to aid in the exploration of career and post-secondary education.  Software, websites, and printed and audiovisual materials are available on topics ranging from personal assessments to career exploration to college selection.

Naviance / Family Connection

Naviance/ Family Connection is a web based college and career program that is designed to assess students’ personalities, learning style, interests, and strengths, explore careers, college majors, post-secondary opportunities, scholarships, and apply to colleges effectively and efficiently. Naviance/Family Connection also allows the schools counseling offices to submit transcripts, secondary school reports, and communicate effectively to students and parents about college visits, scholarship opportunities, and more. Students and parents access their individual accounts through their schools individual Family Connection website.

Visits by College Representatives

College admission representatives visit high schools in the fall and during the school year to make presentations to interested students.  They introduce their school and answer students’ questions.

Visits by Armed Services Personnel

                                               

Recruiters from all the military services are available during their visits or at students’ request.  ROTC and service academy representatives visit in the fall and spring to assist students in applying for these programs.  Visits are during student lunches.

Scholarship Information

Scholarship information is located in the Career Center including books available for check-out.  Copies of posted scholarships and applications are available in the scholarship filing cabinet.

Community Service and Volunteer Opportunities

A bulletin board containing descriptions of a variety of community service and volunteer opportunities along with contact information are available for check-out.

SAT and ACT

Information for college admissions tests are available.  Prep materials and practice tests are also available for check-out.

Career Interest Assessment

Career interest surveys are available for all students.  Students are given interest inventories during their three years of high school.

ASVAB Aptitude Test

This nationally recognized aptitude test is offered to interested students.  Students can sign up in the Counseling/ Career Center.

Career Center Library

Includes a variety of reference material for career, college, financial aid, scholarships, and college admissions.  All books are available for student check-out.

Computer Work

Computers are available in the Career Center for students to use for researching post-secondary education programs, scholarship searches, job application materials and/or class assignments.

Glossary

Key Terms & Abbreviations

ACT:  One of the two commonly used tests designed to assess high school students' general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work.
 
AP:  Advanced Placement Program provides college-level courses available to high school students which may allow a student to earn college credit provided through the College Board.
 
AP CapstoneTM: An innovative diploma program from the College Board that equips students with the, independent research, collaborative teamwork, and communication skills that are increasingly valued by colleges. It cultivates curious, independent, and collaborative scholars and prepares them to make logical, evidence-based decisions. AP Capstone is comprised of two AP courses — AP Seminar and AP Research — and is designed to complement and enhance the discipline-specific study in other AP courses. 
 
ASB:  Associated Student Body
 
ASL:  American Sign Language
 
C&CR:  Career & College Readiness
 
CHS:  College in the High School Program
 
CPR:  Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
 
DECA:  Delta Epsilon Chi and Distributive Education Clubs of America prepares student leaders and entrepreneurs for careers in marketing, finance, hospitality and management in high schools and colleges around the globe.
 
ELL:  English Language Learners
 
IEP:  Individualized Education Program, an IEP is the legal document that defines a child's special education program.
 
JAVA:  Software development program for computer systems fundamentals
 
NCAA:  National Collegiate Athletic Association. The association organizes the athletic programs of numerous colleges and universities.
 
RS:  Running Start is a program that allows juniors and seniors to attend college courses numbered 100 or above, while completing high school.
 
SAT:  One of the two commonly used tests designed to assess high school students' general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work.
 
TP:  A Tech-Prep program of study is a career and technical credit-based transition program. Students enrolled in a Tech-Prep program of study earn college credits.
 
WaNIC:  Washington Network for Innovative Careers provide advanced-level Career and Technical Education programs based on rigorous academic and industry standards, preparing students for post-secondary education and successful entry into high-skill, high-demand careers and employment.
 
WHS: Woodinville High School